Updated 07:04 PM EST, Mon, Mar 08, 2021

Macri Defeats Kirchnerismo in Historic Runoff Election in Argentina

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Macri Defeats Kirchernismo in Historic Runoff Election in Argentina
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA - NOVEMBER 22: Opposition presidential candidate Mauricio Macri celebrates after defeating ruling party candidate Daniel Scioli in a runoff election on November 22, 2015 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Argentina faced its first presidential election runoff in the history of the country with Macri winning decisively ending 12 years of Peronist rule. (Photo : Mario Tama/Getty)

Argentina danced and sung Sunday evening and woke up to a new political reality on Monday. Kirchenerismo is gone and Mauricio Macri, the center-right politician is the new president-elect of Argentina.

He is the first president-elect in Argentina to not have a political ideology called Peronism or Radicalism. The two most dominant political movements of the 20th century in Argentina, since the country returned to democratic rule in 1983, according to many political scientists.

His most urgent problem to tackle: the economy.

"He will have to find out where they [Argentina] stands economically. There is no reliable date. There are no numbers on unemployment, inflation or the economy," said Bruno Binetti, Research Associate for The Inter-American Dialogue. The second task for Macri will be to get dollars and most likely devaluate the currency at a slow level, added Binetti. And finally, he will have to re-organize the Central Bank.

Macri will govern without a majority in Congress and a steadfast block of Peronists as a majority in the Senate. He will need as Binetti said, some "political oxygen." He may not find that much in his first days in office. The honeymoon may not last that long.

All this and deal with regional neighbors who may not be very hospitable to him or his politics. Argentina has historically had strong ties with Chile and Uruguay and the rest of the Mercosur countries. As far as Venezuela, since Hugo Chavez rose to power and his successor Nicolas Madruro has been president the ties have been strong with the Kirchners. With Macri now in the Casa Rosada the bond may be strained. He has said publicly that he will move to have Venezuela suspended from Mercosur for having political prisoners. "The alliance may deteriorate, notes Binetti.

One country that will partner with Argentina if only wearily will be Brazil. Both countries are notoriously protectionist and will be careful to safeguard their economies. According to Binetti, a country that has a strong bond with Argentina is Chile. Even with Chile's Socialist government Macri received a hearty congratulation from the nation, notably from former president Sebastian Pinero.

A figure that Macri will likely use as a role model is Juan Manuel Santos of Colombia. The centrist leader may also be a key ally for Macri in the region.

 Argentina danced and sung Sunday evening and woke up to a new political reality on Monday. Kirchenerismo is gone and Mauricio Macri, the center-right politician is the new president-elect of Argentina.

He is the first president-elect in Argentina to not have a political ideology called Peronism or Radicalism. The two most dominant political movements of the 20th century in Argentina, since the country returned to democratic rule in 1983, according to many political scientists.

His most urgent problem to tackle: the economy.

"He will have to find out where they [Argentina] stands economically. There is no reliable date. There are no numbers on unemployment, inflation or the economy," said Bruno Binetti, Research Associate for The Inter-American Dialogue. The second task for Macri will be to get dollars and most likely devaluate the currency at a slow level, added Binetti. And finally, he will have to re-organize the Central Bank.

Macri will govern without a majority in Congress and a steadfast block of Peronists as a majority in the Senate. He will need as Binetti said, some "political oxygen." He may not find that much in his first days in office. The honeymoon may not last that long.

All this and deal with regional neighbors who may not be very hospitable to him or his politics. Argentina has historically had strong ties with Chile and Uruguay and the rest of the Mercosur countries. As far as Venezuela, since Hugo Chavez rose to power and his successor Nicolas Madruro has been president the ties have been strong with the Kirchners. With Macri now in the Casa Rosada the bond may be strained. He has said publicly that he will move to have Venezuela suspended from Mercosur for having political prisoners. "The alliance may deteriorate, notes Binetti.

One country that will partner with Argentina if only wearily will be Brazil. Both countries are notoriously protectionist and will be careful to safeguard their economies. According to Binetti, a country that has a strong bond with Argentina is Chile. Even with Chile's Socialist government Macri received a hearty congratulation from the nation, notably from former president Sebastian Pinero.

A figure that Macri will likely use as a role model is Juan Manuel Santos of Colombia. The centrist leader may also be a key ally for Macri in the region.

 Argentina danced and sung Sunday evening and woke up to a new political reality on Monday. Kirchenerismo is gone and Mauricio Macri, the center-right politician is the new president-elect of Argentina.

He is the first president-elect in Argentina to not have a political ideology called Peronism or Radicalism. The two most dominant political movements of the 20th century in Argentina, since the country returned to democratic rule in 1983, according to many political scientists.

His most urgent problem to tackle: the economy.

"He will have to find out where they [Argentina] stands economically. There is no reliable date. There are no numbers on unemployment, inflation or the economy," said Bruno Binetti, Research Associate for The Inter-American Dialogue. The second task for Macri will be to get dollars and most likely devaluate the currency at a slow level, added Binetti. And finally, he will have to re-organize the Central Bank.

Macri will govern without a majority in Congress and a steadfast block of Peronists as a majority in the Senate. He will need as Binetti said, some "political oxygen." He may not find that much in his first days in office. The honeymoon may not last that long.

All this and deal with regional neighbors who may not be very hospitable to him or his politics. Argentina has historically had strong ties with Chile and Uruguay and the rest of the Mercosur countries. As far as Venezuela, since Hugo Chavez rose to power and his successor Nicolas Madruro has been president the ties have been strong with the Kirchners. With Macri now in the Casa Rosada the bond may be strained. He has said publicly that he will move to have Venezuela suspended from Mercosur for having political prisoners. "The alliance may deteriorate, notes Binetti.

One country that will partner with Argentina if only wearily will be Brazil. Both countries are notoriously protectionist and will be careful to safeguard their economies. According to Binetti, a country that has a strong bond with Argentina is Chile. Even with Chile's Socialist government Macri received a hearty congratulation from the nation, notably from former president Sebastian Pinero.

A figure that Macri will likely use as a role model is Juan Manuel Santos of Colombia. The centrist leader may also be a key ally for Macri in the region.

Maurico Macri's first hundred days in office will be closely watched by many. The inaguration is December 10. The leader faces an uphill battle. And key cabinet posts will likely paint a picture of what a Macri government will be like. 

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